Aging Memory Loss

Aging Memory Loss

Aging may affect memory as your body starts to make fewer chemicals that are essential for the brain cells to work properly. Aging memory loss is a normal problem and can be prevented by following some healthy practices.
Healthy Diet: You need to remember healthy aging can give healthy memory. Healthy eating habits are indispensable for healthy aging. You need to consume fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Antioxidants can help to keep your brain cells in active state.

Exercise: Exercising regularly helps you to get more oxygen to your brain and thereby reduces the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease that lead to memory loss. It protects the brain cells from damage and promotes the body to produce helpful brain chemicals.

Draw: You can draw some funny pictures near the complicated words. This helps you to remember them easily. You can even imagine a picture with the word or the first letter.

Lifestyle: Healthy lifestyle is a must to prevent aging memory loss. Smoking increases the risk of vascular disorders that contribute to stroke. It can constrict arteries that take oxygen to the brain. If you want to maintain healthy memory throughout life, you need to quit or at least minimize smoking.

Stress can damage the hippocampus in brain. It can also make it difficult to concentrate. Practicing some breathing techniques or meditating regularly can help to manage stress. Good sleep is essential for memory consolidation. Sleeping disorders like sleep apnea and insomnia can affect your ability to concentrate during the day.

If you are experiencing bothersome level of memory loss due to aging, you can follow some simple techniques to combat it. You can write down all the phone numbers, schedules and tasks. You can pay close attention to learn new information. Listen carefully when someone talks to you and repeat the information back to them. Instead of focusing on multiple tasks, you can concentrate on one thing at a time. These tips can help you to cope with aging memory loss.

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